Meyer Lemon Curd

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Oh my!!  Upon tasting my first sample of this creamy, lemony curd, I knew it would be a battle to keep it in the fridge longer than a few days, even if all I did was sneak a few spoonfuls to enjoy each evening.  Stir it into plain yogurt, spoon it into tarts, spread on scones or fold into whipping cream to dollop on a rum-soaked cake or fresh berries, any way you use this curd is insanely delicious. Meyer lemons, a cross between a mandarin orange and a lemon, are sweeter and less acidic than their more well-known cousins.  They are smooth-skinned with very little white pith and the zest is lightly floral. Their season is short, November to March, so winter is the perfect time to enjoy these delicate fruits. Since the curd contains dairy, it’s not possible to safely can it to be shelf-stable, however, it’s fine to freeze it as the texture stays silky and creamy even if frozen.    

Recipe courtesy of Food In Jars.

Ingredients

6 egg yolks

1 cup sugar

3 meyer lemons, juiced (you should get a generous 1/2 cup. Make sure to strain it, to ensure you get all the seeds)

Zest from the juiced lemons

1 stick of butter, cut into chunks

Method

In a small, heavy-bottom pot over medium heat, whisk together the egg yolks and sugar.

Add the lemon juice and zest and switch to stirring with a wooden spoon, so as not to aerate the curd.

Stir continually for 10-15 minutes, adjusting the heat as you go to ensure that it does not boil.

Your curd is done when it has thickened and coats the back of the spoon.

When you determine that it’s finished, drop in the butter and stir until melted.

Position a fine-mesh sieve over a glass or stainless steel bowl and pour the curd through it, to remove any bits of cooked egg and the zest.

Pour the curd into two prepared half-pint jars, leaving 1/2 inch of headspace.  Store in the refrigerator, or freeze for longer storage.